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Fall 2019 Course Descriptions

By definition, TIDES is an interdisciplinary experience, driven by intellectual curiosity, active learning, and experiential education. Discover the exciting topics of this year’s TIDES below. Each class also has an accompanying peer mentor; the fall 2019 peer mentor list will be posted in May.

TIDES courses marked with an asterisk (*) are Service Learning courses.
Students in these courses must also register for the corresponding Service Learning component.

 

TIDE 1000-01 New Orleans Cities of the Dead: Cemetery Architecture & Its Cultural Legacy

W 2:00-3:15p

Students will be introduced to the history and cultural folkways of New Orleans through the study of historic figures, cemetery architecture, monument construction and funerary symbolism reflected in stone and iron.  Why are above-ground tombs more prevalent in New Orleans?  What are the different tomb types and their architectural styles?  Why do families in Louisiana visit cemeteries on All Saints Day?  What symbolism does funerary art in stone and iron reveal?  This TIDES course will provide several informative field sessions to local cemeteries combined with class lectures.

Heather Knight |  BIO

TIDE 1003-01 Happiness & Human Flourishing

R 3:30-4:45p

What can scientific research tell us about practices and perspectives that lead to a happier life? What can psychology do to help ordinary people to thrive and flourish?  Which practices lead to greater fulfillment and life satisfaction?  Positive psychology engages such questions by utilizing scientific research methods to identify practices which lead to greater happiness and human flourishing -- a life rich in purpose, relationships, and enjoyment. Positive psychologists maintain that (1) flourishing requires more than curing pathology; (2) flourishing requires tapping human strengths and positive capacities; and (3) scientific research methods can help us to identify and refine strategies for flourishing.  This course will provide a theoretical and practical introduction to applied positive psychology.   

Topics will include positive emotions, hedonic misprediction and adaptation, character strengths (and their application in academia), purpose, gratitude, kindness, meditation, nurturing social relationships, and more.  Students will learn about the foundational theories and research of positive psychology and will also engage in experiential homework in which they will apply strategies for enhancing their own health and happiness and for positively impacting their relationships and communities.  This course will also expose students to local wellness resources at Tulane and New Orleans and will offer opportunities to explore a variety of life enhancing practices through homework assignments and a few group activities such as attending a yoga class (exercise), a meditation class (mindfulness), and a field trip to the French Quarter exploring New Orleans architecture and history on a walking tour (engagement) and enjoying some local cuisine (savoring).

Hans W. Gruenig |  BIO

TIDE 1117-01 New Orleans Performance Culture

M 2:00-3:15p

There will be two primary goals in this course. The first will involve introducing students to New Orleans’s history, culture, and literature. The second will entail an interdisciplinary introduction to a wide array of influences with the effort of showing how New Orleans’s turbulent history of changing possession, immigration, and migration have contributed to a “performance” of various versions of “New Orleansness.” The course will focus specifically on the presence of French, Spanish, African, and a brief overview of the various immigrant communities in the city’s history and the various ways in which these groups have performed their own version of New Orleans for the city itself, the United States, and the world. In addition, the students will use the maps found in Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas to look at how maps are constructions of authenticity.

Brittany Kennedy, Senior Professor of Practice, Department of Spanish and Portuguese | BIO

TIDE 1145-01 Student Leaders Committed to Cultural Diversity at Tulane

W 3:00-4:15p

In 2016, Tulane University President Mike Fitts established the Race Commission composed of students, staff, faculty, and board members to address issues related to campus diversity. Join this TIDES course as an early step in becoming a student leader committed to this and other diversity initiatives at Tulane. You will learn about the array of programs offered by the Office of Multicultural Affairs. Activities will include academic and social events that bring together TIDES students and members of various student organizations involved in promoting intercultural exchange and understanding. We invite you to become a part of this group of change-makers.

Richard Mihans, Professor of Practice, Teacher Preparation and Certification  |  BIO

Monique Hodges, Assistant Director, Teacher Preparation and Certification  |  BIO

TIDE 1285-01 Crafting & Community in New Orleans

T 5:00-6:15p

Ever wondered about the distinction between arts and crafts, why crafting is popular, or how many beads are in a Mardi Gras Indian costume? Whether you do crafts, buy them, use needle and thread, hammer and nails, or scissors and glue, you are involved in crafting. We’ll learn about crafting as a hobby and a profession and look at local craft culture in New Orleans. We’ll explore assorted craft practices and communities, through creative workshops, guest speakers, and fieldtrips to local craft centers or markets. No experience necessary – but if you’ve ever wanted to learn a craft, this is your opportunity!

Penny Wyatt, Director of Parent Programs and External Relations, Student Affairs  |  BIO

TIDE 1305-01 Different Pictures of New Orleans

R 4:00-5:15p

This TIDES course we will address the question, "What constitutes the heart and soul of New Orleans?" The most common answers are, great restaurants, Mardi Gras, Jazz Fest, French Quarter Festival, Voodoo, Ghosts, the Blue Dog, and of course, the Saints. 

Throughout the semester, we will study and discuss the city's cultural fabric from a folkloric, historical, artistic, literary, and cinematographic point of view. Students will assess the different facets and components that build our great city and contribute to its unique culture through the analysis of assigned text and film material, the participation in class discussions, team presentations, and field trips, as well as in the format of a reflective final paper.

Alexandra Reuber, Senior Professor of Practice, French  |  BIO

TIDE 1430-01 Writing in New Orleans

W 5:00-6:15p

A student adopts and inhabits a new city, becoming native.  Keep a journal of New Orleans.  Write it down!  Take moments, ideas to reflect the experience among peers living in the Crescent City.  Write letters, poems, and lyrics, discussed during workshops in class and on excursions in the city.  Become thoughtful...listen, read, write, converse through language. A journal may recollect moments in tranquility (Wordsworth) or may take the form of day-to-day experience (Bosworth). 

During particular classes the student will be asked to write while on a streetcar, in Audubon Park, and on the levee by the Mississippi river.  Students will keep a journal, participate in a writer’s workshop, give a class presentation, and write a research paper.  Participation is a must.  There are no examinations. 

Beau Boudreaux, Adjunct Faculty, School of Professional Advancement  |  BIO
 

TIDE 1700-01 Cocktails, Cayenne & Creoles: The Myths & Realities of New Orleans Food & Drink

T 5:00-6:15p

As the concept of local foodways becomes entrenched in the growing “foodie” culture of the United States, local food and local dishes become an ever more important marker of place. Whether justified or not, Creole and Cajun food and, of course, the ubiquitous Cocktail, are perceived by many as synonymous with New Orleans. In this course, we will explore the myths and realities of these three key concepts as they apply to food and drink in New Orleans.

Amy George, Senior Professor of Practice, Spanish and Portuguese  |  BIO
 

TIDE 1915-01 Italian Culture in New Orleans

W 3:00-4:15p

The Italian Culture in New Orleans" will focus on different facets and components of the Italians in the Crescent city. Special consideration will be given to the discussion of the following topics: New Orleans and the culture of the Italian emigrants, traditions, cuisine, music, fiction and movie rendering of the Italian emigration.

Roberto Nicosa, Professor of Practice, Italian  |  BIO
 

TIDE 1981-01 Frames Films and Femmes Fatales

T 2:00-3:15p

This course is a critical survey of cinematic works by and about women, with examples drawn from different modes of cinematic expression (mainstream fiction films as well as alternative film and video [including documentaries, experimental, & narrative]) and from different historical periods (from the 1930s to the present). The course deploys feminist approaches to film criticism and applies these approaches to cinematic representations of women. Films illustrating particular genres, as well as feminist and ''women's'' films, are discussed and critiqued. We will consider the role of film in our understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality, as well as race, class, and disability. Through discussions and writing, we will work to discern relevant social, political, ideological, and aesthetic concepts in the media we examine. We will look at contemporary Hollywood and independent cinema, US and some international films by both established and emerging filmmakers.

Aidan Smith, Administrative Assistant Professor, Newcomb College Institute BIO