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Spring 2019 Course Descriptions

By definition, TIDES is an interdisciplinary experience, driven by intellectual curiosity, active learning, and experiential education. Discover the exciting topics of this year’s TIDES below. Each class also has an accompanying peer mentor. Meet yours.

TIDES courses marked with an asterisk (*) are Service Learning courses.
Students in these courses must also register for the corresponding Service Learning component.

 

TIDE 1013-01 The Architecture of Place

W 2:00-3:15p

How can architecture define a place?  How do buildings support social constructs and cultural patterns?  How do spatial relationships, proportions, and forms shape how we move through and experience places?  How do the lines, curves, textures, and colors of walls, roofs, railings and other built elements impact our senses, emotions, and memories?  All of these questions will be explored as students learn about the particular built environment that makes New Orleans so unmistakably New Orleans.  Students will be encouraged to think critically about built environment and to communicate their ideas effectively through writing, visuals, and speech.

Laura Blokker, Adjunct Lecturer, Assistant Director of Preservation Studies, Architecture  |  BIO

TIDE 1018-01 Case Studies in Leadership

T 9:30-10:45a

The Harvard Business School originated and developed the phenomenon of the teaching case to simulate business experience in novices, to create a concrete vehicle for applying abstract theories to real world situations, and to engender engaged classroom discussion while fostering critical thinking skills as students were forced to wrestle with actual business dilemmas that had no easy answer. It is no accident that professional schools were drawn to case teaching—Law, for obvious reasons—but also schools of public affairs and public health whose missions are to utilize the best thinking of the disciplines to prepare students for careers as practitioners. Cases marry learning about real world policy and organizational problems with critical thinking, abstract reasoning, and theorizing valued in all academic disciplines. 

This 1-credit course will utilize a variety of cases which highlight a real life example of a challenge in leadership. Fields covered will include business, politics, non-profit work, and social movements. In most class periods, you will be asked to “inhabit” the case and take up the dilemma of its protagonist. I may assign class members roles to prepare and play in the class discussion spontaneously or in advance. None of the cases have right answers, although we may have an epilogue that tells what actually happened (the historical outcome). You are asked to wrestle with the problem as if it were your own and bring your experience and classroom learning from Tulane University and elsewhere to bear on the questions.

Anna Mitchell Mahoney, Administrative Assistant Professor of Women’s Political Leadership, Newcomb College Institute | BIO

TIDE 1070-01 Museums and their Communities in the Crescent City and Beyond

R 3:30-4:45p

Get to know New Orleans through an exploration of its museums, from art museums to contemporary galleries to house museums and beyond. Students will seek to understand how museums in New Orleans serve diverse communities in the city. To understand museum practice more generally, we will also explore past and current methods in museum curation and education, ethical issues museums face, and how museums respond in times of war and natural disasters. Ideal for students considering majors in art history or history.

Holly Flora, Associate Professor, Art  |  BIO
 

TIDE 1117-01 New Orleans Performance Culture

M 2:00-3:15p

There will be two primary goals in this course. The first will involve introducing students to New Orleans’s history, culture, and literature. The second will entail an interdisciplinary introduction to a wide array of influences with the effort of showing how New Orleans’s turbulent history of changing possession, immigration, and migration have contributed to a “performance” of various versions of “New Orleansness.” The course will focus specifically on the presence of French, Spanish, African, and a brief overview of the various immigrant communities in the city’s history and the various ways in which these groups have performed their own version of New Orleans for the city itself, the United States, and the world. In addition, the students will use the maps found in Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas to look at how maps are constructions of authenticity.

Brittany Kennedy, Senior Professor of Practice, Department of Spanish and Portuguese | BIO

TIDE 1145-01 Student Leaders Committed to Cultural Diversity at Tulane

W 3:00-4:15p

In 2016, Tulane University President Mike Fitts established the Race Commission composed of students, staff, faculty, and board members to address issues related to campus diversity. Join this TIDES course as an early step in becoming a student leader committed to this and other diversity initiatives at Tulane. You will learn about the array of programs offered by the Office of Multicultural Affairs. Activities will include academic and social events that bring together TIDES students and members of various student organizations involved in promoting intercultural exchange and understanding. We invite you to become a part of this group of change-makers.

Richard Mihans, Professor of Practice, Teacher Preparation and Certification  |  BIO

Monique Hodges, Assistant Director, Teacher Preparation and Certification  |  BIO

TIDE 1285-01 Crafting & Community in New Orleans

T 5:00-6:15p

Ever wondered about the distinction between arts and crafts, why crafting is popular, or how many beads are in a Mardi Gras Indian costume? Whether you do crafts, buy them, use needle and thread, hammer and nails, or scissors and glue, you are involved in crafting. We’ll learn about crafting as a hobby and a profession and look at local craft culture in New Orleans. We’ll explore assorted craft practices and communities, through creative workshops, guest speakers, and fieldtrips to local craft centers or markets. No experience necessary – but if you’ve ever wanted to learn a craft, this is your opportunity!

Penny Wyatt, Director of Parent Programs and External Relations, Student Affairs  |  BIO

TIDE 1305-01 Different Pictures of New Orleans

R 4:00-5:15p

This TIDES course we will address the question, "What constitutes the heart and soul of New Orleans?" The most common answers are, great restaurants, Mardi Gras, Jazz Fest, French Quarter Festival, Voodoo, Ghosts, the Blue Dog, and of course, the Saints. 

Throughout the semester, we will study and discuss the city's cultural fabric from a folkloric, historical, artistic, literary, and cinematographic point of view. Students will assess the different facets and components that build our great city and contribute to its unique culture through the analysis of assigned text and film material, the participation in class discussions, team presentations, and field trips, as well as in the format of a reflective final paper.

Alexandra Reuber, Senior Professor of Practice, French  |  BIO

TIDE 1430-01 Writing in New Orleans

W 5:00-6:15p

A student adopts and inhabits a new city, becoming native.  Keep a journal of New Orleans.  Write it down!  Take moments, ideas to reflect the experience among peers living in the Crescent City.  Write letters, poems, and lyrics, discussed during workshops in class and on excursions in the city.  Become thoughtful...listen, read, write, converse through language. A journal may recollect moments in tranquility (Wordsworth) or may take the form of day-to-day experience (Bosworth). 

During particular classes the student will be asked to write while on a streetcar, in Audubon Park, and on the levee by the Mississippi river.  Students will keep a journal, participate in a writer’s workshop, give a class presentation, and write a research paper.  Participation is a must.  There are no examinations. 

Beau Boudreaux, Adjunct Faculty, School of Professional Advancement  |  BIO
 

TIDE 1700-01 Cocktails, Cayenne & Creoles: The Myths & Realities of New Orleans Food & Drink

T 5:00-6:15p

As the concept of local foodways becomes entrenched in the growing “foodie” culture of the United States, local food and local dishes become an ever more important marker of place. Whether justified or not, Creole and Cajun food and, of course, the ubiquitous Cocktail, are perceived by many as synonymous with New Orleans. In this course, we will explore the myths and realities of these three key concepts as they apply to food and drink in New Orleans.

Amy George-Hirons, Senior Professor of Practice, Spanish and Portuguese  |  BIO
 

TIDE 1915-01 Italian Culture in New Orleans

W 3:00-4:15p

The Italian Culture in New Orleans" will focus on different facets and components of the Italians in the Crescent city. Special consideration will be given to the discussion of the following topics: New Orleans and the culture of the Italian emigrants, traditions, cuisine, music, fiction and movie rendering of the Italian emigration.

Roberto Nicosa, Professor of Practice, Italian  |  BIO
 

TIDE 1981-01 Frames Films and Femmes Fatales

T 2:00-3:15p

This course is a critical survey of cinematic works by and about women, with examples drawn from different modes of cinematic expression (mainstream fiction films as well as alternative film and video [including documentaries, experimental, & narrative]) and from different historical periods (from the 1930s to the present). The course deploys feminist approaches to film criticism and applies these approaches to cinematic representations of women. Films illustrating particular genres, as well as feminist and ''women's'' films, are discussed and critiqued. We will consider the role of film in our understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality, as well as race, class, and disability. Through discussions and writing, we will work to discern relevant social, political, ideological, and aesthetic concepts in the media we examine. We will look at contemporary Hollywood and independent cinema, US and some international films by both established and emerging filmmakers.

Aidan Smith, Administrative Assistant Professor, Newcomb College Institute BIO